Snow Boots: A Guide

Who else is snowed in for the next two days? If you’re reading this from the city of Boston, you’re raising your hand. I’ve talked at length about my hatred of winter, and while having an excuse to wear sweatpants for days on end is super nice, I’m not a huge fan of storms. 1) You have to eventually dig your car out from the foot of snow. 2) If you live in the Boston area, you have to fight to protect your space from others (the great parking wars of Cambridge are nothing to joke about). 3) You have to watch where you’re stepping – you could slip on an ice patch. 4) Your shoes get ruined. 5) Everything is cold.

This is why you need the proper footwear to handle the snow. If you live in an area that’s prone to snowstorms, chances are you already have a good pair. For the rest of you who have been holding out on buying a good pair, here are some basics to owning the perfect snow boot.

Traction:

Icebug Eir.

Icebug Eir.

As I mentioned earlier, the winter can be a really slippery time. You need snow boots that have a good grip. If your current snow boots don’t have proper treading, I recommend going to your local shoe repair company and getting some traction added. Trust me, this will do wonders when you’re hurrying to your car. These Icebugs come with special traction, perfect for handling bad weather.

Waterproof:

The North Face.

The North Face.

This may seem like a “duh” tip, but you’ll be surprised at how many snow boots aren’t actually waterproof. Then you have to deal with soaking wet socks and feet, which is never fun. If you’re shopping online, many will say in the description whether or not they’re waterproof. The North Face makes a great product, and anything I own from them that claims its waterproof is high quality.

Height:

Hunter Boots.

Hunter Boots.

Your snow boots need to be tall. Sometimes this can be challenging, which is why I recommend buying Hunter boots and then adding thick linings so your feet aren’t cold. The height will keep snow from falling in when you’re walking through especially heavy piles.

Warmth:

L.L. Bean.

L.L. Bean.

It can be bad if they get wet, but I really recommend buying boots with a thick lining to keep your toes warm. If you walk a lot outside, your feet can get cold fast and you don’t want your heavy wool socks to keep sliding down. These L.L. Bean boots are renowned for their warmth, probably why they’re so popular in New England.

What’s your go-to when the snow hits?

Advertisements